Copernicus who?

This guy is being asked which one of four objects gravitates around the Earth. The price is three thousand euros and, just in case, he has the option to ask the public’s opinion…

Would be funny, if it weren’t so sad. Reminds me of those people that justify their inability to write correctly saying that they are scientists . I had a colleague that always retorted to them: no, you’re not a scientist, you’re just silly!.

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14 Responses to “Copernicus who?”

  1. dmitry Says:

    wow :)

  2. Geoff B. Says:

    Rediculous.

  3. aziz rhatiss Says:

    salut

  4. ItsMe Says:

    # Geoff B. Says:

    Rediculous.

    Like your spelling xD

  5. MSTK Says:

    I probably wouldn’t be able to answer it correctly if I were on that show. But then again, I can’t read French :-p

  6. merku Says:

    Oh putain la quiche …

    (sorry, I’m just ashamed for this guy … everybody knows it’s Venus)

  7. Pierre Says:

    Eh ben mon vieux, bravo a l’education nationale, elle a fait du beau travail depuis 50 ans.
    In english dans le texte

  8. dorigo Says:

    Revolting. That 56% of the public said the sun sends shivers down my spine.
    Cheers,
    T.

  9. andy.s Says:

    Well, it’s kind of a relief that it’s not just Americans who get that mixed up.

    Of course, one could also argue that it’s just a matter one’s choice of coordinate system.

    In rocket or missile guidance software, one often adopts ECEF (Earth-Centered-Earth-Fixed) coordinates or ECI (Earth Centered Inertial) coordinate systems. And in those systems, all of the above revolve around the earth.

    But hey, this is television, not rocket science:)

  10. Bo Says:

    Actually – the question is a fallacy…. all objects have a gravitational effect on all other objects. So in fact all of those answers are correct.

    But we all know they meant the moon, so i’ll say he’s an idiot like everyone else.

  11. Florine Says:

    @Bo: According to my dictionary (“euroglot”, not very extensive but OK), although ‘graviter’ means ‘to gravitate’, ‘graviter autour de’ means ‘to revolve around’. So I guess the question is not a fallacy.

  12. What revolves around the earth? « Qulog 2.0 Says:

    […] here) Filed under: Science, Education, Second-hand blogging […]

  13. francescopadormo Says:

    That’s one of the most hoffific things I’ve ever seen!

  14. francescopadormo Says:

    Let me correct myself: horrific.

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